NORTON META TAG

10 October 2014

FOREIGN POLICY EDITOR'S PICKS 6-10OKT14



Monday, October 6
Welcome to Editors' Picks, FP's round-up of the day's best articles.

Today, we look Ebola’s devastating impact on Guinea’s society, the anti-Hong Kong rant going viral in China, and the Most Interesting Man in the World’s cause célèbre.
1
FROM THE MAGAZINE: Ty Carter won a Medal of Honor in Afghanistan. Now he has one more enemy to fight: PTSD. FP’s Yochi Dreazen writes about the battle at home in an age of endless war: Read more
2
FEAR AND LOATHING IN GUINEA: FP contributor Peter Tinti reports from the dangerous heart of the Ebola outbreak in Guinea. As the virus spreads, the disease isn't just killing people, it's threatening to tear the country apart: Read more
3
NOT LOST IN TRANSLATION: "A muddle-headed toddler leading a blindfolded donkey"? Tea Leaf Nation translated China’s viral anti-Hong Kong rant that compares protesters to peasant farmers: Read more
4
THE MOST INTERESTING MAN IN THE WORLD: He doesn't always take on humanitarian causes... but when he does, the husky, tuxedoed Don Juan from the Dos Equis commercials wants to rid the world of landmines: Read more
5
ARMING THE ISLAMIC STATE: How did the Islamic State get so many U.S. weapons? Read the report on how the militants got locked and loaded in Iraq and Syria: Read more

Tuesday, October 7
Welcome to Editors' Picks, FP's round-up of the day's best articles.

Today, we look at previously classified cables that show how the United States undermined Kurdish forces, Pyongyang’s looming nuclear threat, and how Occupy Central can learn from Tahrir Square.
1
THE KURDISTAN CABLES: Contributor Jake Hess uncovers previously classified State Department documents that show how the U.S. tried to engage and undermine the Kurdish fighters protecting Kobani. An FP exclusive: Read more
2
PHOTOS OF THE DAY: They fled their homes, but their husbands and sons stayed to fight the Islamic State. Andrew Quilty photographed Syrian women who fled from Kobani in a refugee camp just over the Turkish border in Suruç: Read more
3
SILENT, BUT DEADLY: Kim Jong Un is missing and Pyongyang is quiet, but a quiet North Korea is still a dangerous North Korea. Five reasons why: Read more
4
"FAILURE IS THE BEST TEACHER": A veteran of Egypt’s own uprisings offers his advice on what Hong Kong's Occupy Central protesters can learn from Cairo’s Tahrir Square: Read more
5
RUMBLE IN THE PENTAGON: Should senior military officers resign in protest if Obama disregards their advice? The latest from Shadow Government: Read more

Wednesday, October 8
Welcome to Editors' Picks, FP's round-up of the day's best articles.

Today, we look at Turkey's political game in Kobani, the boom of anti-gay laws across Africa, and China's strange and powerful farming militia.
1
WHILE KOBANI BURNS: As the Islamic State advances on Kobani, Kurdish officials say they have been betrayed by the Turkish government. FP’s David Kenner reports: Read more
2
THE CLOSETED CONTINENT: 38 out of 55 African countries have laws punishing sodomy. FP’s Suzanne Nossel writes that it might get worse before it gets better: Read more
3
CHINA'S MILITARY-FARMING COMPLEX: One of China's more peculiar organizations just turned 60: A vast farming militia that cultivates cotton, tomatoes, and dabbles in mining and textiles -- when it's not fighting terrorism: Read more
4
HANGMAN'S JUSTICE: The new Afghanistan is meant to be a better place for women, but the execution of five men in a gang-rape case is no victory for human rights in the country: Read more
5
"THERE’S GOING TO BE FAILURES": After weeks of Syrian Kurdish fighters holding back the Islamic State's advance, the Pentagon says Kobani could fall into the militant group's hands: Read more

Thursday, October 9
Welcome to Editors' Picks, FP's round-up of the day's best articles.

Today, we look at what's holding up the U.S. response to Ebola, Hong Kong’s untamed protest art, and the would-be kingmaker in Ukraine's upcoming elections.
1
ONE COMMITTEE AT A TIME: The Pentagon is deploying troops to West Africa to combat Ebola, but a key Senate committee isn't ready to fund the mission just yet. FP’s John Hudson and Kate Brannen report: Read more
2
THE STRAPPED AND THE FABULOUS: Swedish clothing retailer H&M is ensnared in a pseudo-scandal and accused of ripping off the uniforms of female Kurdish fighters: Read more
3
THUG POLITICS, KIEV: Ukraine's parliamentary elections are heating up. Meet Oleh Lyashko, the radical populist who could play kingmaker in the post-Maidan political order: Read more
4
THE ART OF RESISTANCE: It's spontaneous and participatory -- and the state can't control it. Tea Leaf Nation analyzes Hong Kong’s protest art: Read more
5
INFECTED COMMUNITIES: Health workers aren’t the only ones fighting Ebola. Hip-hop artists, imams, and radio personalities are beating back the deadly virus. FP contributor Peter Tinti reports from Guinea: Read more

Friday, October 10
Welcome to Editors' Picks, FP's round-up of the day's best articles.

Today, we look at why Turkey won't lift a finger to save Kobani and how Assad's PR nightmare is now Obama's.
1
KIDS THESE DAYS: Has the Nobel Committee done Malala a disservice by giving her the Peace Prize? FP’s Elias Groll writes on how the award could end up hurting her cause: Read more
2
STUCK IN THE MIDDLE: Turkey can’t seem to make up its mind about who’s the bigger enemy: the Islamic State or the Kurds. FP’s David Kenner reports from Istanbul: Read more
3
SPEAKERS FOR THE DEAD: The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, the quintessential resource for documenting the Assad regime's mass atrocities, is no longer just a PR nightmare for Damascus. It's also one for the U.S. military: Read more
4
IT RHYMES WITH SICKHEAD: You can drink at a soccer game, you can fight at one, and you can certainly swear at one -- just don't call Putin dirty names: Read more
5
A LANDMARK CASE: Kenya's president is charged with inciting ethnic violence that killed thousands. Now he's about to talk his way out of it like it's a parking ticket: Read more